Gospel

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The Time is Now Father Jim McKeon
28 June 2022
There was once a bright and young woman named Kate and Kate wanted to serve God. She was in her final year of school she said 'when I finish my exams, then, I will serve God'. Well she finished her exams, and went to uni. Uni of course is harder than school. She said 'when I finish uni, then, I will serve God'. She finished uni and got a joy. Young graduates are pushed hard to do long hours. So she said 'well, maybe soon I will serve God'. Life got busy. She met a nice man. God married and had kids. Then, she was busy like she never knew before.....
 
Blog - to be people of the Beatitudes Marist Laity Australia
23 June 2022
Jesus did not say “Blessed are those who are happy”. Jesus did not say “Blessed are those that make money”. Jesus did not say “Blessed are those powerful and in control”. Rather Jesus said, “Blessed are those who mourn”. Rather Jesus said, “Blessed are those who are poor”. Rather Jesus said, “Blessed are those who are humble and persecuted”. It is so that the love of God might be seen through you and me. We are called to become instruments of God’s love. We need to realign our values and choices. We cannot do this alone. To be people of the Beatitudes is to choose the road less travelled. Not to choose suffering. But to choose to be instruments of hope. To be chose to be beacons of hope. So that the love of God can flow through our hearts.
 
The Chosen - Jesus and the Samaritan Woman At The Well The Chosen
18 June 2022
At the beginning of Jesus' ministry he goes to the well of Jacob in Samaria in the middle of the day by himself. Jesus interacts with a Samaritan woman and in effect breaks the Jewish law. Jesus chooses her to be one of the first to proclaim that Jesus is the Messiah. Jesus chooses the rejected as the voice for the Kingdom of God.
 
Baptism in the Spirit Father Jim McKeon
05 June 2022
How do we fall in love? Last week our parish began the Alpha Marriage program. It begins with a lovely old British couple with posh eloquent British accents. Nicky and Cecelia telling us how they met on a group holiday 40 years ago. Each of them liked the look of each other and felt attracted to one another over the space of the holiday. But each were too nervous to say anything to the other for fear of being rejected. It was only on the last day of the holiday that they found the courage to speak openly.
 
Gospel Reflection - Daring to doubt Father Jim McKeon
25 April 2022
When something seems too good to be true it often is. We see a lot of this on the internet. That $50 iphone. The beautiful stranger who wants to find true love with you or the Nigerian prince who wants to give you one million dollars. We are rightly sceptical and doubtful about such things because they are usually not true. It must have seen too good to be true for those first disciples 2000 years ago who were heart broken at the death of Jesus when they suddenly found in alive again. It was heart for those who saw him face to face such as the disciples on the road to Emmaus. Mary Magdalene and the original apostles. It was hard for them to accept that Jesus had risen again. Let alone poor old Thomas who was out of the room when Jesus came back. We often call Thomas doubting Thomas. We need to cut him some slack and call him 'reasonable sceptical Thomas'.
 
Easter Reflection - Jesus a source of new life for us Father Jim McKeon
18 April 2022
Here in Australia we have been blessed not to have experienced the high levels of sickness and death that so many people throughout the world have experienced with COVID 19 in the last 2 years. But for lockdowns that kept us for the most part safe, came at their own cost. The cost of families, friends and communities being isolated from each other for sometimes extended periods of time. Of people being under financial and job stress. Of businesses struggling to survive. As well as health care workers on the front line who are in continual crisis day after day. Another group baring the brunt of the pandemic were young parents and grandparents who were trying to home school their children....
 
Book - Our Lady of Holy Saturday Cardinal Martini
18 April 2022
I am now going to enter this house where the mother of Jesus is spending her holy Saturday, and with John’s permission try and talk to her. The conversation is inspired first of all by contemplating the way in which Mary lived this dramatic moment.
 
Resurrection - You are my witness IFC Films
18 April 2022
Mary Magdalene is the first witness of the resurrection and the apostle to the apostles.
 
Good Friday Father Kevin OShea
15 April 2022
As we listen to John’s account of the actual dying of Jesus, we feel the mystery of it all. We would love to have been there. We would love to know what his last moments were like. John tries to tell us in his gospel. Before we think about what he says, we need to look at what other gospel writers have said about those last moments of Jesus. They all give a different account of it. John has Jesus dying in complete silence. Mark has him dying with a loud cry. Silences and shouting: the silence of Jesus, the last cry of Jesus. We hear both of them. And we are there in the midst of them.
 
Movie - Mary Magdalene Garth Davis
15 April 2022
Judea, 33 AD. Mary is a faithful young girl from the village of Magdala (close to Galilea Lake) unsure to follow the traditions and destiny reserved to the women, living only as wife and mother, in her wish to be free. After to reject a marriage proposal of Ephraim, a family friend, her brother Daniel and her father Elisha make her an exorcism in the belief that she is possessed by a demon. Trying to find a solution Elisha asks help Jesus, a healer who is earning fame between the Jews of the zone with his speeches about a kingdom of peace and love free of hate, tyranny, oppression and prosecution, to heal Mary and that finally she obeys and submits to their will. Astonished by the charisma, personality and words of Jesus, Mary decides to follow him despite the strong opposition of her family.
 
Palm Sunday Michael Whelan sm
09 April 2022
Jesus is led like a lamb to the slaughter. We are made in the image and likeness of this vulnerable God. Have you ever thought that being vulnerable is part of the essence of being a fulfilled human being? That is very counter intuitive for Western cultures. We seek fulfilment in the opposite of being in control. This deep primitive desire to be in control is actually an instinct for fascism. We find in Jesus a quality of venerability the primary antidote to the instinct of fascism. Rowan Williams says 'it is in the cross that we see in the revelation of what it is that characterises Gods personal being'
 
Movie - The Passion of the Christ Mel Gibson
09 April 2022
Documentary and Trailer of the Passion of the Christ
 
Dreaming of the Ocean Father Jim McKeon
27 March 2022
If you want to get a man to build a boat, you can teach him to saw planks of wood and hammer nails or you can teach him to dream of the ocean. The first way will get the job done. The boat will get built, but it might never leave the shore. But the person who dreams of the ocean, who yearns for the open seas will find a way to get the skills, to get the tools and get the equipment to build the boat. Then they will launch out into the deep and sail out into the horizon.
 
Time to Repent Father Jim McKeon
20 March 2022
What does Jesus mean when he says 'Unless you repent you will all perish as they did?'. Homily for 3rd Sunday of Lent Year C
 
Father Yvan Mathieu - Introduction to Genesis Father Yvan Mathieu
19 March 2022
An introduction to the book of Genesis and the Bible with Marist Father Yvan Mathieu.
 
Lectio Reflection - 3rd Sunday in Lent - Luke 13:1-9 Bishop David Walker, Anthony Maher and Father John Frauenfelder
19 March 2022
This important Gospel is about repentance. There is a contrast between between human mortality and what one expects after death. What is being contrast between just dying and dying with repentance. The point being made is that at times Israel has lacked repentance. There is a patience of God which allows people time to repent. But there is an urgency.
 
Reflection on Jesus in the Desert Father Jim McKeon
05 March 2022
Father Jim gives an insightful reflection on the Gospel reading of Jesus in the desert and the temptation. He starts by linking to the super hero character development then leads quickly into the story of Jesus in the desert. The temptation by the devil tries to make Jesus into something he is not. Do we know scripture to rebuke our false thinking? Do we stay no to these temptations?
 
Entering the Desert of Lent - Bishop Barron Bishop Barron
02 March 2022
With the beginning of Lent right around the corner, Bishop Barron talks about this ancient period of prayer, fasting, and almsgiving in preparation for Easter, and offer several recommendations on how to have a more spiritually powerful Lent.
 
Do what ever he tells you - Anne Dooley Anne Dooley
16 January 2022
Being invited by Maria Baden and the Marist Laity Committee to offer the keynote address at this inaugural Marist Laity Conference in Australia is a great privilege and I thank them for this wonderful opportunity to be involved in the conference in this way. We all bring a wealth of life experience and faith and are Marists 'to the core' of our being. One of the main hopes for this conference is to share our Marist Spirit with others and this morning I hope to begin that process by sharing something of my own story. Alongside this, in breaking open the gospel story of the Wedding at Cana we will be tapping into the story of Mary and, ultimately, the story of her Son, Jesus as we are called to 'Do whatever he tells you.'
 
Bishop Dons Christmas Message and perseverance Bishop Don Bolen
10 January 2022
Getting ready for Christmas this year, many have found themselves needing to find the courage and resilience to keep going, to come to a place of gratitude and joy. I came across an old story on the internet a few days ago, from the American author Grace Paley, recounting how her elderly bedridden father shared with her a word of how to persevere when growing old, and his main advice was this: “when you get up in the morning you must take your heart in your two hands. You must do this every morning.... Talk softly (to it)... You can whisper also, Remember, remember.”
 
Bishop Vincent Longs Christmas Message 2021 Bishop Vincent Long
05 January 2022
Jesus is the fullness of God’s revelation of love for us and for all of creation. This means that no matter who we are: male or female, black or white, straight or gay, rich or poor, high or low, citizen or refugee, God’s love embraces us and reverences us all. Jesus came down to live in a typical Middle Eastern village called Nazareth, that was home to a couple of hundred ‘country’ people. He did not decide to brandish his power, but to spend most of his time with the powerless and disenfranchised.
 
Feast of the Epiphany Jeff Cavins
02 January 2022
The Feast of the Epiphany, Jeff Cavins explains how—just as the Magi were drawn to Christ—people from around the world are drawn to the gospel when we live it authentically.
 
I got lost at Christmas Fr Jim McKeon
26 December 2021
Some years ago my friend Joel took me canyoning in the Blue Mountains for a day. Canyoning is following a stream or a river following its origin up on the ridge, down through to the valley floor. We had a beautiful day of abseiling down through water falls.
 
Song - Hark The Herald Angels Sing - Amy Grant Amy Grant
26 December 2021
Hark! The herald angels sing. 'Glory to the newborn King'. Peace on earth and mercy mild. God and sinners reconciled
 
Short film - The Shepherd - A story of the first Christmas The Chosen
26 December 2021
The Chosen tells the story of the first Christmas through the eyes of a shepherd whose life of suffering and rejection changes when he and his fellow shepherds receive a miraculous revelation.
 
The nativity - Will you let me love you Michael Whelan sm
25 December 2021
Human communication is frail yet full of all sorts of potential. At its best, it can be the bearer of love and affirmation, clarification and helpful facts, it can build and strengthen relationships. At its worst, it can be the bearer of hate and denigration, obfuscation and “alternate facts”, it can destroy and undermine relationships. We can use communication – whether it is through words or silence, rituals or symbols, physical gestures or facial expressions – to reveal and conceal, to cut and to heal.
 
Gathering becomes crucial to the incarnation Michael Whelan sm
19 December 2021
We are communal animals. It is in our nature to gather. It is not surprising therefore that the Incarnation manifests itself in human beings gathering. It is our faith that the gathering can become empowered and informed and shaped and led by the Holy Spirit of God. Today’s Gospel – Luke 1:39-45 – is a good example. Mary, prompted by the Angel’s message to her – “The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you; … And now, your relative Elizabeth in her old age has also conceived a son” (1:35-37) – goes to Elizabeth. When she greets Elizabeth, John is brought into the gathering – “he leaped in her womb”.
 
A hornets nest Michael Whelan sm
12 December 2021
In today’s Gospel – Luke 3:10-18 – a lot is happening! The crowds are pressing on John the Baptist for instructions as to what they must do. They are “filled with expectation”. This is a dangerous situation, especially with the Roman authorities hyper-alert to any signs of the Pax Romana being upset. John deflects attention from himself: “I baptize you with water; but one who is more powerful than I is coming; I am not worthy to untie the thong of his sandals. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire”.<
 
TV Scene - Joseph & Mary On the Road to Bethlehem The Chosen
06 December 2021
Have you ever thought about what Mary and Joseph would have talked about on the road to Bethlehem? They barely knew each while bearing the weight of the greatest moment in human history.
 
Joys and Hopes Michael Whelan sm
05 December 2021
Pope Paul VI at the end of the Second Vatican Council said “in previous times, in the past and in the present century, that church was absent and cut off from human culture”. This is a damming thing to say. Siege mentality that was often used.
 
Reasons to be afraid Michael Whelan sm
28 November 2021
Central to our thinking about the Christian life is the Incarnation – God’s being in the flesh. That is both a historical fact – which includes the political, the cultural, the social and the physical – and a theological fact. The reality of the Incarnation means, amongst other things, that we encounter God in history not outside history. We must resist any temptation to avoid the historical facts of life. Sometimes the Church has been regarded as some kind of metaphysical reality that stands outside history
 
Feast of Christ the King Michael Whelan sm
21 November 2021
Then Pilate entered the headquarters again, summoned Jesus, and asked him, “Are you the King of the Jews?” Jesus answered, “Do you ask this on your own, or did others tell you about me?” Pilate replied, “I am not a Jew, am I?
 
Graham Kendrick - The Servant King Graham Kendrick
21 November 2021
From heaven you came helpless babe. Entered our world, your glory veiled. Not to be served but to serve. And give Your life that we might live. This is our God, the Servant King. He calls us now to follow Him. To bring our lives as a daily offering. Of worship to the Servant King
 
Belief and Incoherence Michael Whelan sm
14 November 2021
In today’s Gospel – Mark 13:24-32 – we have an example of apocalyptic literature, a particular articulation of our shared belief. The English word, “apocalyptic”, comes from the Greek word, apokaluptein meaning “uncover” or “reveal”. The central focus of Christian apocalyptic literature – indeed of all Christian witness – is the uncovering or revealing of the glory of God in Jesus who is the Christ. We might reasonably think of today’s Gospel text as an incoherent articulation of the ineffable.
 
Jesus forgives Mary Magdalene The Chosen
14 November 2021
This is a moving seen of redemption. Mary Magdalene returns to Jesus and seeks forgiveness. Jesus treats Mary with a tremendous amount of human dignity. Jesus sees the dignity of who Mary is.
 
Song - Look Up Chosen - Lauren Daigle Lauren Daigle and the Chosen
14 November 2021
Where are You nowWhen darkness seems to win? Where are You now. When the world is crumbling?
 
Religion is about relationships Michael Whelan sm
07 November 2021
Our relationships with ourselves is where we start. But, do not start get into self deception. Who I am and what is happening in my life is crucial. To myself and that of the world at large. Pope Francis’ Laudatio Si has suggested we have tended to ignore our relationship with creation, or even abuse it. But religion helps to give us structure to enable relationships With God, self, other human beings, and the world at large. When religion forgets this primary purpose It becomes an ideology or an idea. Ideology is about imposing a world view. But, when religion maintains its soul, Dialogue is natural. Hospitality is natural. Reaching out is natural.
 
Great listening Dadirri - Hear O Israel Michael Whelan sm
31 October 2021
In 1987, an aboriginal elder from the Daly River, Miriam Ungunmerr-Baumann, addressed a liturgy conference in Tasmania. The content of that presentation struck a deep resonance with her audience. Miriam began: “What I want to talk about today is another special quality of my people. I believe it is the most important. …. It is perhaps the greatest gift we can give to our fellow Australians. In our language, this quality is called ‘dadirri’. It is inner, deep listening, and quite, still awareness. ‘Dadirri’ recognizes the deep spring that is inside us. We call on it and it calls to us. This is the gift that Australia is thirsting for. It is something like what you call ‘contemplation’. When I experience ‘dadirri’ I am made whole again. I can sit on the river bank or walk through the trees; even if someone close to me has passed away, I can find my peace in this silent awareness. There is no need of words”.
 
Seeing with the eye of the heart Michael Whelan sm
23 October 2021
On the evening of 28 October 1958, Angelo Roncalli stepped onto the balcony at St Peter’s as the newly elected Pope John XXIII. Three hundred thousand people in St Peter’s Square greeted him. Later he reflected in his diary: “I remembered Jesus’ warning: ‘Learn of me for I am meek and humble of heart’. Dazzled by the television lights, I could see nothing but an amorphous swaying mass. I blessed Rome and the world as though I were a blind man. As I came away I thought of all the cameras and lights that from now on, at every moment, would be directed on me. And I said to myself: if you don’t remain a disciple of the gentle and humble Master, you’ll understand nothing even of temporal realities. Then you will be really blind” (Cited in Peter Hebblethwaite, John XXIII – Pope of the Council, London: HarperCollins, 1984/1994, 287-288).
 
What is a servant? Michael Whelan sm
16 October 2021
Service is a constant theme in the Bible. It takes on a particular significance in the Christian Scriptures. Sometimes the theme is explicit, mostly it is implicit. Thus, Matthew tells us: “The Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many” (20:28). Life in the kingdom is characterized by service: “You also ought to wash one another’s feet” (John 13:14) and “just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me” (Matthew 25:40).
 
Questing allows us to live life Michael Whelan sm
10 October 2021
We easily forget that, at the heart of the word “question” is the word “quest”. This forgetfulness gives rise to a certain way of questioning that is merely functional. For example, I might ask one of the attendants in the supermarket, “Where is the washing powder?” or I might ask my doctor, “What is the best diet for me?”. It is probably fair to say that, for many, this merely functional questioning is the only kind of questioning.
 
Marriage is fragile Michael Whelan sm
03 October 2021
They are both on a journey. That over time, the two will become one flesh. But seldom, do we live out that image. Marriage is fragile and vulnerable journey.The laying downof one’s life.In sacrifice.It is the union with Jesus, that the couple findthe epitome,of their union.
 
Book - My cry for that all that lives Mary Burke
03 October 2021
The stories in this work date back to the first century in the Christian era. They are the foundation stories of Western cultures and have held profound and world-shaping meanings for its audiences - for better or otherwise. As readers of this literature, we would like to pay attention to where these stories hit a chord or a dischord with us in che 21' century. How do we, reading through an eco-feminisc lens, encounter these stories and what liberating meaning might we find in chem? We may wonder, in face, are chey really 'good news' for women, for marginalised peoples, for the Earth in our world today? And if so, how?
 
What is missing? Michael Whelan sm
26 September 2021
What is missing? What is it that gets in the way of the good news? Of being transformed by the good news? The paradox is that we gain control by letting go. Blessed are those who can let go.
 
Falling in Love Michael Whelan sm
19 September 2021
Falling in love is a metaphor for being a disciple .
 
Wake up Michael Whelan sm
12 September 2021
Waking up is the work of a lifetime. Most of us will have particular moments of insight and new awareness from time to time. These are a normal part of an inner journey by which we become who and what we are – God’s creation. Today’s Gospel – Mark 8:25-37 – describes a moment of awakening for the disciples. It comes after many missed opportunities, it must be said. It is rare for human beings to grasp the first opportunity that life offers to wake up.
 
Reflection on Solitude - Mark 7:31 Michael Whelan sm
05 September 2021
We can recognize here the place of solitude in Jesus’ life. The English word “solitude” has its roots in the Latin word, solus, meaning “alone”. It is, however, quite different from simply “being alone”. Solitude is about being present to yourself – really present. That can indeed be aided by being alone. However, we can also experience solitude in a crowd. And we can resist solitude when we are alone. Solitude is a choice. It is facing the truth within. Solitude is an essential part of becoming
 
What does it mean to be church? Michael Whelan sm
29 August 2021
The kingdom – the Person – slowly emerges as a reality for us individually and communally in the context of human society. We must have rules and rituals for society to function. But those rules and rituals are not to be regarded as the instruments of our moral triumphs, but enablers of grace – the graced emergence of the kingdom.
 
A Hard Teaching - John 6 Michael Whelan sm
22 August 2021
If we have grown up within a Eucharistic faith, we may glide over “this teaching” that so affronted the disciples. Here is a little exercise. Imagine you are there with the disciples. Take a little time to construct the scene in your imagination. Catch Jesus’ eye. He holds your gaze and tells you: “Unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood you will not have life in you”. Hold his gaze. After a moment he says to you: “Do you also wish to go away?”
 
Jesus heals Simons mother-in-law The Chosen online TV Series
20 August 2021
Simon or Peters Mother in-law is sick to the point of death. Jesus comes to Simons house and heals her of her sickness.
 
Everything is more than it seems Michael Whelan sm
15 August 2021
What we generally refer to as the “real world”, is largely constructed by human beings. It is a necessary fiction. Imagine trying to live without (at least some) shared meaning and values, agreed rules, regulations, and so on. Chaos and anarchy would ensue – at least until someone or some group takes charge and constructs an alternative “real world”. Dystopian movies such as the Mad Max series make much of this horrible possibility. 
 
Who can not worry? Michael Whelan sm
08 August 2021
Today’s Gospel – Matthew 6:25-34 – seems like a call to mobilize our willpower and strive not to worry. That would be a formula for worry! Add Jesus’ authority and the worry will be intensified by false guilt. This text needs careful interpretation.
 
Our hearts are wrestless Michael Whelan sm
31 July 2021
In today’s Gospel – John 6:24-35 – we are told that the people are “looking for Jesus”. What do they want? What do they expect? Jesus says to them: “You are looking for me, not because you saw signs, but because you ate your fill of the loaves”. Still, they do not understand what he is pointing out to them. So they ask for a program, a sort of moral schedule that will ensure that they will be able to please God: “What must we do to perform the works of God?”
 
At the heart of it is how we deal with Vulnerability Michael Whelan sm
24 July 2021
In today’s Gospel – John 6:1-15 – we see Jesus with his disciples in an awkward situation. A large crowd had followed Jesus in the wilderness. Why? Because they believed in him as the Son of God? No! It was “because they saw the signs that he was doing for the sick”. They were not reading the miracles as “signs” but as power. Vulnerable people seeking invulnerability? They wanted some of that power channeled in their direction! This led to a potentially embarrassing outcome: “Jesus said to Philip: ‘Where are we to buy bread for these people to eat?’ He said this to test him, for he himself knew what he was going to do. Philip answered him, ‘Six months’ wages would not buy enough bread for each of them to get a little’.”
 
Being sent out Michael Whelan sm
11 July 2021
In today’s Gospel – Mark 6:7-13 – the fishermen are introduced to the mission: “Jesus called the twelve and began to send them out two by two, and gave them authority over the unclean spirits”. We are told little more than that “they cast out many demons, and anointed with oil many who were sick and cured them”. Notice, Jesus has not yet entrusted them with the ultimate task of proclaiming the reign of God, the Kingdom.
 
TV scene - Calling the disciples The Chosen online TV Series
11 July 2021
From the TV series 'The Chosen'. Watch the miracle of the fish and the calling of the first disciples.
 
We are but travellers here Michael Whelan sm
04 July 2021
A reflection on the Gospel Mark 6:1-6. A very wise old psychotherapist once told me that the work of the psychotherapist is to help people feel at home in the world, while the work of the spiritual director is to help people not feel at home in the world. If you are in anyway reflective, you will be aware of the “more than”. The presence of the “more than” can have varying and sometimes quite challenging effects on us.
 
Jairus and the lady - Gospel Reflection Michael Whelan sm
27 June 2021
Unlike the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, Mark’s Gospel has no account of Jesus’ birth or early life. Mark plunges straight into the story of John the Baptist and the baptism of Jesus. A brief reference is made to the temptations in the desert then Jesus begins his public ministry. There is a sense of urgency. The first disciples are called, the sick are healed, demons are cast out, parables are told, Jesus sails back and forth across the Sea of Galilee, from the Jewish side to the Gentile side . . . he is on a mission!
 
Lost in the Storm Michael Whelan sm
20 June 2021
All three synoptic Gospels give accounts of the calming of the storm – see Matthew 8:23–27; Luke 8:22–25 and Mark 4:35-41 which is today’s Gospel. Each of the accounts is remarkably similar. There is one extraordinary detail, however, that sets Mark’s account apart. At the height of their fear, Mark tells us that “they” – the disciples – said to Jesus, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” Don’t you care! What a thing to say to Jesus!
 
Planting Seed Michael Whelan sm
12 June 2021
“The kingdom of God is as if someone would scatter seed on the ground, and would sleep and rise night and day, and the seed would sprout and grow, he does not know how.” So begins today’s Gospel – see Mark 4:26-34. What a peculiar way to speak of “the Kingdom of God”! But parables are like that. They present the imagination with a series of triggers that can awaken us to new and deeper truths. Consider the last phrase as such a trigger – “he does not know how”. It challenges our taken for granted understanding of what it means to know. It invites us to open ourselves to a much deeper knowing – one that might, in fact, look more like “unknowing”.
 
Source and Summit of the Christian Life Michael Whelan sm
06 June 2021
Today we celebrate the Feast of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ. Our Gospel – Mark 14:12-16 & 22-26 – gives us an intriguing description of the final meal Jesus has with his disciples. Is this a formal, Passover ritual or a more informal meal?
 
Feast of the Holy Trinity - Matthew 28:16-20 Michael Whelan sm
29 May 2021
Today is the Feast of the Most Holy Trinity. It is a celebration of the Loving Community that we call God. Our Gospel text is a brief and simple one – Matthew 28:16-20: “make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit”
 
Explore Pentecost in the Gospels - John 15:26 Michael Whelan sm
23 May 2021
Today’s Gospel – John 15:26-27 & 16:12-15 – reminds us of another Johannine theme: “Truth” – “when the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth”. “Truth”, as used by John, can only be understood in the context of the other themes, especially, menō.
 
Feast of Pentecost Marist Laity Australia
23 May 2021
In ancient times in Judaism, The Jewish feast of Pentecost (Shavuot) was primarily a thanksgiving for the first fruits of the wheat harvest (from Wikipedia). Pentecost celebrated the many fruits and gifts which God would provide.
 
Mark 16:15-20 Michael Whelan sm
16 May 2021
Endings are part and parcel of everyday life. Endings change things. Endings may be predictable or unpredictable, remarkable or unremarkable. The day ends, a night’s sleep ends, a meal ends, a conversation ends, a journey ends, a relationship ends, a career ends, a life ends. Day to day living simply would not go on without endings.
 
Jesus evangelisation Eminence Stephen Cardinal Kim . Archbishop of Seoul, Korea
09 May 2021
His Eminence Stephen Cardinal Kim. In order to help us understand our mission of evangelizing the poor, I wish to reflect with all of you about the kind of evangelization that Jesus did. I thought of calling this talk: 'Jesus' Evangelization of the Poor', since, in His heart, the poor were the prime target of His Good News. But the thought occurred to me that Jesus' evangelization was not limited to the poor. Rather, his bias for the poor, His evangelization of the poor, His identification with the poor was itself His message of evangelization to the rich as well, showing them in a most graphic way the path of their salvation.
 
John 15:9-17 Michael Whelan sm
09 May 2021
Our Gospel today – John 15:9-17 – contains nine explicit references to love. Together they emphasize a profound and practical truth: Being a disciple of Jesus is being in love. The first of these references sets the context for the others: The Father’s love for Jesus. In his First Letter John spells this out: “God is love . . . all love is from God; everyone who loves is born of God and knows God . . . God sent his only Son into the world so that we might live through him. In this is love, not that we loved God but that he loved us” – see 1 John 4:8-10.
 
Luke 24:35-48 Michael Whelan sm
18 April 2021
One of the truly striking features of the Gospels is that they are focused on Jesus himself. Jesus is the Good News! That is nowhere more so than in today’s Gospel – Luke 24:35-48. When describing the reactions of the disciples, Luke uses words like, “startled” and “terrified” and “frightened”. However, perhaps the most interesting of his descriptions is, “in their joy they were disbelieving and still wondering”.
 
Nicodemus talking to Jesus The Chosen
14 April 2021
God so loved the world that he gave his only-begotten Son,so that everyone who believes in him might not perishbut might have eternal life.
 
John 20:19-31 Michael Whelan sm
10 April 2021
In John’s Gospel, Thomas seems to be a man of drive and energy, ready to take on a challenge, a man of high ideals. But he also likes to be convinced that what he is doing is worth it. We meet him in John 11:16, when Jesus announces his intention of returning to Judea to visit Lazarus: “Thomas, who was called the Twin, said to his fellow disciples, ‘Let us also go, that we may die with him’”. Thomas does not really know what he is saying!
 
Bishop Dons Easter Message 2021 Archbishop Donald Bolen Archbishop of Regina Canada
06 April 2021
From Canadian Archbishop of Regina. Over the years, I have had a recurring dream. Until a few days ago, I had not thought of this dream as being connected to Easter. Whenever I have had this dream, I have been deeply stirred by it. It comes in two forms....
 
Bishop Vincent Longs Easter Message 2021 Bishop Vincent Long
05 April 2021
At the heart of the Easter message is the summons to a new future, framed with hope and possibility, in the midst of entrenched hopelessness. As with Mary and the disciples, who were emboldened to move from the shadows of crucifixion into the light and life of the Risen Christ, the Church must live this message.
 
Mark 16:1-9 Michael Whelan sm
04 April 2021
Listen to the hopelessness in those opening lines of today’s Gospel – Mark 16:1-8: “When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices, so that they might go and anoint him. And very early on the first day of the week, when the sun had risen, they went to the tomb. They had been saying to one another, ‘Who will roll away the stone for us from the entrance to the tomb?’” It is not difficult to imagine the women walking with their heads down. The harsh truth of what they had personally witnessed was weighing heavily on them. From the arrest of Jesus, through his “trial”, torture and eventual brutal crucifixion, they had every last ounce of hope wrung out of them. That Friday was not a beginning but an unimaginably horrid ending.
 
Easter Reflection from the Superior General Marist Father John Larsen
04 April 2021
For many people Easter weekend is celebrated with friends and family, with sports events and taking “a bit of a break”. This year the Covid virus puts a dark cloud over some of these celebrations, but people do the best they can. There may be the hope that in the midst of all these celebrations people remember the joy of the Resurrection. Well, perhaps!
 
Mark 14:1-15:47 Michael Whelan sm
28 March 2021
Madeleine Albright, US Secretary of State from 1997 to 2001, published a book entitled, Fascism: A Warning (London: William Collins, 2018). She was eleven when she escaped from Czechoslovakia with her parents and two siblings. She lost “three grandparents, and numerous aunts, uncles and cousins … among the millions of Jews who had died in the ultimate act of Fascism – the Holocaust”
 
John 12:20-33 Michael Whelan sm
21 March 2021
It is easy to forget – and we must not forget! – the huge transformation that the disciples have to go through in their thinking of the Christ. The standard assumptions would have been strongly influenced by the legends of David passed down through the ages. At the very least, the Christ would meet some acceptable criteria of human success. Little if anything in current thinking prepared them for a Christ who would be vulnerable, apparently defeated by the powers that be, left to die an ignominious death like a criminal on a Roman cross for the passing world to mock.
 
Download Family Prayer Marist Laity Australia
14 March 2021
You are invited to download and PRINT the following prayer. Print a copy for each person. Include the colouring exercise - mindful activity either during the prayer or after.
 
John 3:14-21 Michael Whelan sm
14 March 2021
In today’s brief Gospel text – John 3:14-21 – John has Jesus make a summary statement of human moral possibilities: “The light has come into the world, and people loved darkness rather than light because their deeds were evil. For all who do evil hate the light and do not come to the light, so that their deeds may not be exposed. But those who do what is true come to the light”.
 
The woman at the well The Chosen TV Series
04 March 2021
John 4:5-42. A scene from the series The Chosen.
 
Mark 9:2-10 Michael Whelan sm
28 February 2021
The second affirmation occurs at the transfiguration of Jesus. The transfiguration begins the testing period leading to Jerusalem and the Cross – the second half of Mark’s Gospel.
 
Mark 1:12-15 Father Michael Whelan SM
21 February 2021
We are in the presence of someone who has experienced an event that has turned his world on its head – he has been driven into the wilderness by the Spirit of God! By any measure – if it is true what we say about the Incarnation – it should also turn my world on its head.
 
Mark 1:29 Father Michael Whelan SM
07 February 2021
A short reflection on Jesus calling of his disciples and mission of Jesus Christ.
 
The Magnificat John Thornhill sm
04 February 2021
By John Thornhill sm The Magnificat is probably the most revealing text about Mary. It comes from Saint Luke. Saint Luke really loved Mary and was very interested in Mary. There is a rich number of text in Luke’s infancy Gospel and the other parts of the Gospel.
 
Mark 1:21 Father Michael Whelan SM
31 January 2021
A short reflection on authority both in Jesus in his day, but also today.
 
Mark 1:14 Michael Whelan sm
24 January 2021
A short reflection on the calling of Peter in the Gospels.
 
A New Year’s Resolution Andrew Dumas
31 December 2020
Watch this 5-minute video from Marist Laity Australia. Download the Prayer sheet. Pray the prayer individually or share with your family or community.
 
A Christmas Reflection for 2020 Andrew Dumas
18 December 2020
As we conclude 2020, this year will be forever marked as the Covid year. Where many parts of the world have struggled and continue to struggle to contain the Covid virus. As Marists, we feel called to go out into the community. To care for the poor, the outcast and to the edges of our society. There is a certain level of guilt not to have done some of the things we could do to work to care for others. The question, “Where would Christ and Mary be amongst this”? Who are the good angels?
 





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